Garden Share Collective... size...

31 August, 2015

Welcome to the new format of the Garden Share Collective, a group of food gardening bloggers/instagramers and the like who post monthly on their gardening shenanigans.

Many thanks to Lizzie for starting the GSC happy fun times.


Given there is now a new format of the GSC I'm a little unsure how to proceed. But as this month's theme is size, I'll do my best to give a bit of an idea of what is going on in the garden within the bounds of the theme.

My garden pretty much takes up the majority of the just over 750 square meter block, minus the space for the moderately sized house and garage. I have no lawn whatsoever, and besides a 3x5m paved area and the many square meters of gravel paths, the space is pretty much entirely growing areas.

The backyard houses the majority of the dedicated annual veg patch, with six 2.4m x 1.2m wicking beds.


This currently has the remaining brassicas (stills some small cauli's coming along, as well as a few broccoli and romanesco plants) as well as carrots, silverbeet, spinach, onions and peas.

Also in the edible plant category are a few fruit trees, including the fig and an ANZAC peach, which now also has Blackburn Elberta grafted onto it and which new shoots are flowering, so I'm hopeful for the first crop of these this coming season.

Peach blossom just starting.

Heading around to the back part of the yard is the orchard.


This area houses the majority of the espaliered apples and is looking a bit threadbare at the moment, with most of the trees just bare sticks. There are a few onions on the right, regular and purple sprouting broccoli on the left, and behind those the faint pink bloom of the nectarine. The asparagus patch also sits in this area, but is just a pile of mulch at the moment.

Moving around to the front yard, we stop off on the way in the newly built polytunnel/fruit cage.


The polytunnel is 4m x 2.8m and has some newly transplanted capsicum/chilli plants and the recently planted tomato seeds, which are have just started to germinate (3 seeds are up and running, yay!).

Next to the polytunnel is the fruit cage (approx 4.5m x 2.8m) and which houses the fruiting plants in wicking buckets, including gooseberries, blueberries, apples, plums, damson, sloe and apricot trees. On the left is the espaliered cherries, which will hopefully in time grow up the pagoda which leans against the house.

Moving onwards we come to the front yard.


I actually have no idea how big this space is. As the block is a weird triangular shape, with the house smack bang in the middle, this space covers the front entrance of the house and around to the side. This is an interplanted space with fruit trees and veg amongst the ornamentals.

Example: almond tree next to the pink camelia:


This space currently has cabbages, kale, onions and silverbeet, as well as the lemon which is giving plenty of fruit.


Also in this space are cider apples, two plums, white mulberry, banana (looking slightly sad after getting a bit frosted earlier on this year, but bravely putting out new leaves), mango, lychee, pear, sour cherry, three sweet cherries, two thornless blackberries and three varieties of raspberry.

Turning around past the lemon, we head back around into the backyard where it all began, and the most recent gardening events have occurred, where I pulled out two badly situated (it was awkward to get around them to reach the wicking bed when I moved them, but I refused to move them out until I had harvested the apples on them) stepover apples.

These are now in the pots while I decide where their new homes will be, and the space under the peach expanded and some strawberries transplanted below.


Hopefully that fits the bill for the new look GSC.

While I usually report on the next month's garden to do list, this time around there isn't much to report, as I'm just about to head off for five weeks in Europe (Italy, Spain and a few days in Paris). So for the next month blogging will be fairly quiet, unless I manage to come across some gardening on my travels.  But I look forward to reading everyone's posts and getting inspired to do lots when I get back!

18 comments:

  1. I enjoyed this very scenic tour around your garden. I think this is a nice time of year, when everything is just starting to come out but it's not yet crazy-busy. at least that's what it is like here right now!
    happy holidays - what a wonderful itinerary. enjoy!

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    1. Cheers! It is a nice time of year, when the weather is slowly improving and the buds are starting to burst.
      Thanks - I'm sure it will be a wonderful trip.

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  2. Oh your trip sounds amazing! Have a wonderful time and travel safely. Your garden just keeps getting more and more amazing. The poly tunnel is fabulous and congrats on the sprouted tomatoes. Have a great holiday

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    1. Thanks! I am very excited by the possibilities of the polytunnel, and I hope the tomatoes survive while I'm away. Lucky I have a very garden savvy housesitter, so it should be ok.

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  3. Have a wonderful trip. I have never heard of fruit trees in wicking beds, I might have to look into that for our new place as it would be totally move-able. Thanks for joining in the GSC and your post is perfect. I loved that I get a grand tour of your garden. Have a great month and enjoy your time abroad.

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    1. Thanks Lizzie. The plants are really in adapted wicking "buckets" - they are really easy and much more suitable for plants in pots than the regular pots which I find dry out so quickly in our hot summers.

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  4. Thanks for the update and tour of your garden, I saw your fruit wicking pots last visit I need to do that for my blueberries, happy holidays.

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    1. My blueberries have never been happier than in their wicking buckets. I used a general azalea (acid loving) potting mix and they have gone from strength to strength.

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  5. I'm always impressed by how beautifully laid out your garden is. You really do make excellent use of the space.

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    1. Cheers. I have now officially run out of space as all the yard areas are used, but you never know. Gardens are constantly evolving, so who knows what crazy idea I'll come up with next.

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  6. Your garden is so lovely. We have a little bit of lawn in our yard. Though the biggest expanse is the driveable grass in the front yard. The law requires two parking spots per unit, so four with our house. But we ripped out the pavement and just have two. So the driveable grass structure lets us stay within the law and not have so much pavement. Though it isn't a great lawn as the structure that supports the car doesn't let the grass grow all that lush. It is so much cooler than having more pavement. And it lets the rain absorb into the ground as the area tends to have more issues with flooding than drought.

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    1. Cheers! I like the idea of functional lawns like yours, just not a lawn for lawns sake. Especially it is served dual purposes like cooking and water harvesting.

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  7. It really is shaping up very nicely! So much has established now and it all appears to be going great guns. Cheers, Maree.

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  8. Oh have a wonderful trip. Your garden is so lovely - I just adore those wandering pathways, and you have a huge amount of variety.

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    1. Cheers, I am just checking in from Florence :) but it's nice to be reminded of home

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  9. Lovely Bec, fantastic use of your house block, can,t wait to see how well all your fruit trees do, wish we had planted ours when we built our house. Looks very productive.Might try cover my Raspberry patch like your fruit tunnel.Georgie

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    1. Cheers Georgie. I am hopeful of good cherry (already started), plum, peach, pear and apple crops this year, and maybe even some citrus for the first time. I do remember reading a gardening saying that the best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago, the next best time is today. So true! :)

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