What to do on a rainy day...

12 July, 2015

Today it has been bucketing down in Melbourne. I'm very happy to see the rain, but it does mean I can't get into the garden as much as I'd like. I did some gardening early this morning until it started to really pelt down. Then I had to look for non-outdoor activities.

What's the closest thing to food gardening. Well cooking from the garden of course.

Given I had a bit of time, I decided to do a dish I'd been meaning to do for a while. In fact, I let a nettle plant that sprung up in my garden the year before last go to seed on purpose. I this year have a healthy bunch of nettles in the orchard, and so I put on the raincoat and picked them with the express purpose of making nettle pasta.


So that's what I did.

I picked a basket of the lushest nettle tops. It was probably around the equivalent of 6 big handfuls of nettle, though you'd never want to handle a handful of nettles without the toughest of gloves. Unless you are the type who likes pain.

Said amount of nettles were blanched in boiling water then fished out and put in a bowl of iced water. This apparently ensures they stay a nice bright green, as opposed to overcooking and going a bleugh grey colour.

The blanched tops got a through whizzing in the thermomix to get fully pulped, then the pulp (around one and a half cups) was mixed with 500g flour, 2 eggs and a little water, again in the thermomix.

I let the dough rest, then got to work with the pasta maker.

After much rolling, I have a bunch of nettle fettuchini...


(mmm, pasta)


... and a heap of sheets I will dry and break up for lasagne.


Just look at that lurid green.


I just hope it tastes as good as it looks.

Now I'm off to do my other favourite thing on a rainy day, sit on the couch and re-read an old favourite.

14 comments:

  1. I like to cook on cold rainy days too.

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    1. Totally the best way to use time not suitable for being in the garden!

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  2. That is AWESOME!
    Dry out some nettles for nettle tea. I like that. :)

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    1. Cheers! Thanks for the idea. Must do that.

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  3. Excellent use of nettles. Cheers for sharing :)

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  4. Amazing how we can live in the same city (albeit at opposite ends) and your nettles are (apparently) flourishing, while mine have died right back for the winter. I still have a supply of dried ones though, and these go into bread, soups and casseroles. I must drag out my pasta maker again. I only used it once to try it out. The pasta was totally different to the bought stuff.

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    1. True! Mine are just starting to go to seed, but are still very green. Which I am grateful for. Hmmm, I've never thought to dry them, then cook. Are they still prickly when dried?
      Yes, homemade fresh pasta is a world of difference to the bought stuff. And not that hard to do really.

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  5. that's a fabulous colour! I hope its stays when boiled. yum!
    and lucky you having oodles of rain. please send some down to me :-)

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    1. So do I! It's still drying on my kitchen chairs, so the cooking test will be later in the week, I think.
      With the rain we've had the past few day, I'd be happy to send some down. I am a bit sick of it now. But come a dry spell I'll be wishing it back again!

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  6. That colour is amazing! I'm not sure I'd be absolutely identify a nettle correctly. Might start searching of that's the result.

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    1. Google search images - you can't really mistake something else for a nettle. Just don't touch them - they're prickly bastards.

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  7. Hi Bek. I was pointed to this post after I wrote about stinging nettles. The pasta looks fantastic! Might try this today. Thanks heaps!

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    1. Cheers! I hope you tried and enjoyed it!

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