An easy way to pick plums...

11 February, 2015


The Zeigler plum is full of ripe fruit. This is usually a precursor to the local birds decending and pilfering all my delicious fruits.

But not this time, as I have netted the tree weeks ago.


The trade off with the nets is that picking becomes a bit more of a palaver. You have to unwrap the nets to access the fruit, which while necessary is slightly annoying.

But no more.

Witness my patetented plum picking method:

Step 1: Select plum.


Step 2: Pull picked plum through the net.


Step 3: Eat.


While this will obviously only work for small fruit like plums, it is a handy method for garden munching.

Do you have any garden harvest tricks?

14 comments:

  1. Don't let the possums see you doing that!

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  2. I have some friends with a plum tree. They don't net it, so the animals get a lot, but they harvest by putting a tarp down and shaking the tree. Or at least they do when there are a lot of plums on the tree.

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    1. I think mine will eventually get to the point of being too big to net, but for now I'm netting it otherwise I wouldn't get a thing. But I do like the idea of the shake and harvest method.

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  3. that made me chuckle.i agree - picki netted fruit is definitely a palaver sometimes. i'm already workign out better ways to do it next year.

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    1. I'm glad I made you laugh. :) There are always better ways I'm sure. My next plan is start pickets with polytube arches to make a better frame. But the issues of fighting through the net will likely be the same. Ah well.

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  4. Hi Bek, I enjoyed the article about you in the Age today. You might be interested to know that I bought 3 grafted avocados 3 years ago (Gwen, Hass and Reed) for about $100, and last year we got 1 Reed, and this year there about 30 are looking like they have set across the three trees this year. We are not far from you in Williamstown. Cheers, Liza.

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    1. Cheers Liza. That's really interesting, as other sources I'd found said they took ages. They may be referring to seed grown ones though. Do you know what rootstock yours are grafted onto. And are they planted in the ground or pots? How big are they likely to grow?
      Sorry for the multitude of questions but I'm fascinated. You've made me rethink the avocado altogether. Now to try and find a space to squeeze in another tree... :)

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    2. Hi Bek.
      They are planted in the ground, next to the driveway into the colourbond garage near a cement driveway on the western edge of the block, so plenty of warmth. The idea is to sort of hedge them, I will keep them narrow and only a meter above the fence for privacy and western sun shielding...but there's lime trees planted between as well. (Just to gild the luxury lily, I would like to plant stawberries beneath, but the area is on grey water which is a no no, apparently). The stock for the Gwen and Hass is "zutano", for some reason I've not kept the Reed tag. Clive Blazey from Diggers is very keen on pulling out camellias and planting avocados, and there's lot of advice and rules on type A and type B varieties...I just got a rush of blood and bought mine at the local farmers market one day. I think the 10 year theory is from the ones you grow from stones, and even then v much a gamble...Peter Cundall writes spend the money for a named, carefully bred fruit tree and save time and uncertainty, and I think that's good advice. If all our babies make it to the fruitbowl, they will pay for themselves this year!

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    3. Thanks for the info Liza! I will be looking into avocados now for sure!

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  5. Well done on making it into the Sunday Age. A good advert for food growing at home. Hope you get a lot of extra followers.

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    1. Thanks Bev! I'm glad the article came across well. It was a fun and interesting experience.

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  6. Thanks for reminding. I have a tree full of peaches (many of which have dropped already and unfortunately) that needs picking. They've all come ripe at roughly the same time so I shall just de-net.

    Say, can you drop me a line at paul@pipmagazine.com.au - I'd love to run something past you.

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    1. Cheers, I will!
      I hope you manage to salvage most of the fallen fruit. There is nothing worse than wasting a good peach!

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