Garden Share Collective: January...

04 January, 2015

Hiya all. It has been (like for many I'm sure) a hectic few weeks over the festive season and the last days of 2014, hence the silence on the blogging front. But with the new year here and things slowing down on the social side of things I actually have some time to devote to sharing garden happenings.

Which ties in nicely with the timing for Garden Share Collective, brought to us by Lizzie at Strayed from the Table.

Planting

I've planted out some bush beans and climbing beans, basil plants, watermelons and some successive sowings of cucumbers.

Also in a first for me I've tried planting the pinched out side shoots of tomatoes from the pinched out vs. free growing tomato trial.

The lower leaves were removed then I whacked them straight into the ground under the apple espaliers. They are partially shaded which I think has helped them not die. They looked a bit droopy for a week but are looking pretty good now.


I will definitely be continuing this way of multiplying my tomato plants.

Harvesting


Loads more summer crops are coming along now. I'm getting heaps of capsicums and peppers from the plants overwintered in the greenhouse.


Cucumbers are growing well up their supports and I'm harvesting a few each day.



Zucchini are coming along well.


I also am growing for the first time a 'Trombonico' zucchini, which I've got climbing up the thornless blackberry plants. It has set its first fruit. Yay!


In almost harvests there are lots and lots of green tomatoes.







I think either some of the grape type varieties or the Green Zebra's (last photo) will be the first to ripen. I'm hoping in the next two to three weeks there will be a ripe tomato to nom.

The only current fruit are the berries. Strawberries have gone past their main flush and don't crop that well over the hottest of the summer months, so I'm only picking a few each day or two.

Raspberries likewise have slowed right down. Luckily I've managed to get about 2 kilos in the freezer. But I'm still getting a small handful every day or two to keep me happy.

Overtaking the raspberries has been the thornless blackberries. I have two plants which I'm training over a wire and star picket arrangement. These are likewise giving a handful or so, but excitingly are only starting so I'm also hoping to have more of these babies to freeze, or even preserve some blackberry sauce.


It may not look like much but it's enough for my breakfast yoghurt, or a mid afternoon snack, or on ice-cream for a lavish dessert.

To do:

  • Succession sow more cucumbers and beans.
  • Keep planting out tomato side shoots as I prick them out.
  • Start some brassicas for winter crops (every year this feels way to early to think about winter crops, but it makes all the difference!).
  • Net the plum and peach to make sure the birds and possums are foiled in their fruit thievery.

Don't forget to check out other GSC contributions at Lizzie's.

22 comments:

  1. I really needed to see your post today. All those nice green things and harvests. It snowed last night and I'm really missing summer.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it.
      I kinda wish it would snow here, but then I remember how bitterly I complain when the temp is below 10 degrees C and come to the conclusion I probably wouldn't enjoy it as much as I romanticise it. :)

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  2. I'm keen to see how your tomato experiment turns out. If it is worthwhile planting out the side shoots.
    Your garden is looking lovely. I think it's almost time to sow some winter brassicas too especially Brussels sprouts which never seem to have enough time in the cold in my garden.

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    1. I will be sure to blog about whether I get a harvest off them or not.
      Cheers.
      Yes, brussels sprouts. Must remember to sow seeds of those.

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  3. 2kgs of raspberries in the freezer, I can only dream. I too am glad things have slowed down after the past few weeks of hecticness. Time for some relaxing gardening and to tackle the weeds. Happy New Year

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    1. They don't last long let me assure you!
      Happy New Year to you too!

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  4. Your garden looks so abundant. I have serious raspberry envy!

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    1. Aw, thanks. Raspberry envy is an easy thing to have it seems.

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  5. I love the way you grow your zuchini and cucumber on angled trellis. Awesome to have your own raspberries.

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    1. Yes, it is by far the best way I've found to grow them! I don't think I could live without raspberry plants now. A simple pleasure.

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  6. You cucum ers and capsicum are amazing. Those tomatoes are going to ripen soon and you will have an abundance of gorgeous, tasty tomatoes. Your garden looks lovely, very healthy and I will be interested to see how your bush beans grow. Lovely blackberries too, the thornless ones are lovely and I envy you for growing raspberries Bek, you have a wonderful climate. Happy New Year :D

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    1. Cheers Merryn. I hope very much to have an abundance of tomatoes, not least for lots of tomato salads and giving them away of course, but also for passata and bottled tomatoes. I ran out of passata in about September and I cannot wait to make it again. Bought just don't cut it! Happy New Year! :)

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  7. 2kg of raspberries, that is amazing! I wish! What are you doing with all of the cucumbers? The capsicum plant is gorgeous. I have been pinching the laterals out from our tomatoes for the last few years and have great success with it. They are much easier to manage when they are not a bushy crazy mess of leaves. Happy New Year and have a great month in the garden.

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    1. Thanks Krystie! The cucumbers are all getting eaten, either as garden snacks or in salads. Today's went into a watermelon, cucumber, spinach, halloumi and mint salad and they were delicious. I don't think I quite have enough yet for preserving, but I may make some fermented/pickled cucumbers if I have a real glut.
      I do see what you mean about tomatoes being easier to manage when pinched out. Mine that are free growing are a crazy tomato jungle now. But I'm going to stick with it and see what the long term outcomes are. Happy New Year and have a great month in the garden also.

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  8. I love all your different tomato varieties. You're going to have a wonderful supply in a month or two. Further to the comments above, I find tomatoes survive Adelaide summers best if they're not pruned much and are allowed to have plenty of leafy growth.

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    1. Cheers! I can't imagine only growing one or two tomato varieties. This year I felt I was restrained and I have around 28 types. I was wondering about that. I do think that too much pruning in our sunny hot climate is actually worse for the plant. We shall see when we have a bit more of the summer heat.

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  9. Red capsicum in early January - excellent work, overwintered capsici! I'm also super impressed with your tomato cuttings.

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    1. Yes, yay for overwintering! The transplanting of tomato pruning a is a revelation. Let's see if they will have time to get big enough to produce fruit...

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  10. Your garden is really moving along - looks like the harvest basket will be overflowing pretty soon! And of course, you are providing me with more inspiration to get some berry bushes in the ground next year!

    I also grew tromboncino squash for the first time this past summer and it was my favourite. Unfortunately I was only able to harvest two squash. When it comes to squash, I take what I can get - it is one of those crops I struggle with every year - but I keep trying!

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    1. I have high hopes of a cucumber glut soon! Yes, we all have our crop of pain. Mine is eggplants. They always seem to grow slowly and I rarely get a crop, and yet I still planted at least 10 of them this year. Nary an eggplant to be seen yet.

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  11. Is that an Aldi greenhouse I spy? All that is left of mine is the frame too.

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    1. I bought mine at Bunnings, but it was pretty cheap so might be the same as one sold at Aldi. Either epway it's been pretty good. I removed the cover earlier in summer, it still will be ok but has some areas where the plastic has broken down, so will need a bit of taping up to be good for this winter.

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