How to store asparagus...

31 October, 2014

I had to share this tip, as it's been revolutionary to my asparagus eating experience. I may well be the only person out there so behind the times as to not already doing this with asparagus, but anyhoo.

Unless you grow fifty gazillion asparagus plants (slight exaggeration), you will have days when you harvest just a few stalks from your asparagus crowns.

Standard harvest these days: a few spears and plenty of purple sprouting broccoli.

Four asparagus spears does not make a meal. Not in my world. So I would store spears in the fridge crisper until I had enough for a feast. It would take a few days to get a sufficient amount, by which time the first spears would inevitably be wilting a little.

No more.


That is the secret: a jar of water.

Simple, yet amazeballs.

Just add spears to the jar until you get to the point that you can't fit any more in. Then its asparagus gluttony time. Every spear stays as fresh as the day it was picked.

(BTW, the tomato sauce is actually homemade. I just keep re-using that bottle, because I find it more convenient to use a squeeze style bottle than try and pour sauce from the screw top bottles I preserve in. So I decant. Just so you know.)

Which one is the variety 'Fat Bastard' do you think?

Once the jar is full there is a good handful of asparagus.


Yay. Asparagus gluttony time!

Do you have any good fruit or veg storage tips? Especially for typical homegrown harvests.

14 comments:

  1. I blogged about this recently. Just a bit extra...don't snap off the bottom ends until you're ready to eat. They will get a bit slimy in the water, so you'll be getting rid of those ends anyway. Also, they will keep elongating in the water, so you'll find you have a bit more length than you originally picked.

    Can't think why more people don't grow them...they are so easy. I'm still amazed at the jaw-dropping looks I get when I say I'm growing my own.

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    1. Ah, it must have been your blog where I read this. I couldn't for the life of me remember where I got the tip. Also, thanks for the heads up on potential slime. I haven't seen this yet, but now won't be grossed out if I do. Cheers!
      I think it's that asparagus has the reputation of being picky, and needing very specific planting. I agree, it's easy. I believe it doesn't like very wet areas, but in the aus climate we have more issues with too dry than too wet. Also the needing to give them a set area like any perennial. So if space is an issue it would be less of a priority. Wicking bucket, maybe?

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  2. Oh, it's not really slimy, only just if you leave them too long in the water, which you don't normally do as you're busting for a delicious meal ;-)

    It would have to be a very big bucket, methinks. They have HUGE root systems. Years ago I tried to transplant some that were in a large planter box. There was no way I could move the matted roots. I gave up and hacked them to bits with a hatchet just to get them out.

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    1. Ah, I've never tried to dig one up, so didn't realise the roots were so big. That'll learn me.
      I hope they survived the hatchet.

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  3. Well - I for one did not know to store asparagus like this. Not that I have an asparagus patch yet...but it is on the list for next year!

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    1. You might want to consider growing the aspargus from seed. If you sow it now, you can keep the one year old plants in pots until you plant out your asparagus patch next year. I find the plants are stronger seed grown than the over dried crowns for sale. But if you get good quality crowns they would be better. Good luck! It's so worth it for homegrown asparagus.

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  4. I had not heard of this either. Great tip, thanks for sharing! Once you've grown your own asparagus you would never buy it again. Can't believe my mum used to serve tinned asparagus wrapped in white bread as a canapé. YUK!!!!

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    1. No problem, if someone else can benefit all the better!
      Wow, that sounds pretty revolting. Who knows what we'll be saying about food we used to serve in a few decades time. Tastes and fashions change so drastically. But its good for a laugh though.

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  5. The way I store asparagus (don't know where/ how I found this tip) is just to wrap the ends in moist paper towel and place in a plastic storage container. I would be scared if you left the tips exposed in the fridge they would dry out- perhaps not ? but the paper towel seems to work too. Just chuck it in the worm farm when its done.

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    1. Hmm, that sounds good. With the jar method the tips don't dry out, but it may not be superior to the moist paper method. Whatever works methinks. Cheers for another idea.

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  6. I do this too Bek, because I noticed that they always store them in shallow water trays in the posh green grocers! I guess it is like keeping flowers in water. I also do this with herbs if I want to keep them a couple of days.
    I am looking forward to planting some asparagus next year, then eating my fill in, oh, about four years from now? My favourite spring breakfast, dipping asparagus spears in a soft boiled egg. Mmm..

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    1. Yes, I have noticed that, also at farmers markets, but it never occured to me to do it at home.
      You may be able to have a homegrown asparagus snack sooner, though unlikely a whole meal. I grew five crowns in my first year, and some were strong enough that I could crop a spear or two in the second year. As long as it is bigger than your pinky finger, its up for grabs.

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    2. Brilliant! I just planted out 10 crowns this year (thought seed would take forever). Hard as it was I didn't eat a single shoot rather leaving them to grow and fingers crossed next year there could be a bumper crop. Now I know how to store them. In fact I will have to do that with the ordinary shop bought ones rather than have them go mushy in the crisper

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    3. Crowns are a good shortcut. Using this tip with store bought asparagus does work, but with homegrown it is just that bit more special!

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