Garden Share Collective: October

05 October, 2014

It being the first weekend of the month, it's time for Garden Share Collective. Cheers to Lizzie for starting the GSC.


Gardening at this time of year is both joy and pain. When the sun is out and the birds are singing it seems like anything will grow if you can just get it into the ground. Then the sun goes behind the clouds and you feel the cold and remember: spring is only just beginning. Don't get ahead of yourself.

That said, things are moving on from last month.

Planting

Seed continues to be raised mostly indoors. Eggplants and peppers are hitting their germination strides, but are a while away from being planted outdoors.

Cucumbers will shortly be kicked out from inside into the big, wide world: aka planted out. Pumpkins ditto. They will require lots of snail protection.

The tomatoes are all outdoors now, some being planted out just recently while the remainder are still in their punnets. These are kept outdoors against a north facing brick wall, with some large bluestone blocks around them to both protect from wind and be heat sinks, releasing the warmth overnight to protect the tomato seedlings from cold shock. The whole shebang gets covered with garden fleece on any cold night for a little extra protection.

In other solanum news, I have also planted out some potatoes. Some was bought seed potatoes (Spunta) while I also had a few Dutch Creams go green, so I chitted these and planted them out too.

Harvesting

The garden harvests have been well and truly on the cusp of the winter/spring garden. Old winter stalwarts continue, including cabbage (only two left now), kale and broccoli. The kale bed is looking a bit sad, but there are still plenty of edible leaves.


Peas have been continuing well, although have started to get a bit of mildew. I've treated this with a soap/milk spray and it seems to be improving.


Purple sprouting broccoli is just beginning.


Proper spring crops of artichokes and asparagus are starting to hit their strides with good harvests.



And in super exciting news, I think this will be the year of the earliest ever tomato!


To do:
  • Plant out cucumbers and pumpkins.
  • Sow zucchini outdoors.
  • Coddle the tomatoes until they get planted out, likely around late October.
  • Keep on top of the broccoli, pulling out any that go to seed.

That seems to be it for me in October. Don't forget to check out other garden happenings at Lizzie's.

22 comments:

  1. i think your kale is anythign but sad! i love that pretty variety. next year i'll try that one.
    i agree with you on the weather - so changable. greta when the sun is out, but definitely not when a cloud rolls over!

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    1. I dunno, it's looked more lush. The variety is red Russian.

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  2. That purple broccoli is gorgeous! Great tips for protecting tomatoes, it is easy to get excited by Spring's warmth and then be caught by the evening chill (and snails and slugs!) Have a great month in the garden

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    1. Cheers! Yes, snails and slugs are my nemesis. As they are for all gardeners.
      Have a great month too!

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  3. I love your purple broccoli and artichokes - who says vegie gardens can't be decorative? My asparagus is finished, sadly, but yours looks great.

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    1. True, veggie gardens can be very pretty places. That sounds like a very early asparagus season. I would be quite happy with that, as I've been a bit sick of cabbage and broccoli. But I'll be missing them in summer. The delights of seasonal eating.

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  4. Great post! Your garden looks amazing. I have never grown artichoke or asparagus, I must be boring. Fab idea with that brick. Looks like you will be having some very early toms. Mine are yet to go into the dirt. Although I did plant some spuds this weekend :)

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    1. Aww shucks. Asparagus particularly is very worthwhile. Just plant crowns (although I've raised it from seed too) and sit on your hands for a year or two so you aren't tempted to pick it to early. The harvest as many spears as the plant can produce for 6 weeks a year.
      Yay for concurrent spud plantings :)

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  5. I have asparagus envy! We planted purple sprouting broccoli this year but sadly only the bugs got to eat it. Lovely photos.

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    1. Sorry ;)
      The PSB is good, but not that good if you know what I mean. I am happy to have it, but think next year I won't grow more than a plant or two. That take up a lot of space for a long time, and I'm not convinced they're worth it.

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  6. It's so great to read how your garden is marching into spring when over here in the UK we're heading for winter. I've got artichokes, asparagus and purple sprouting to look forward to in the spring, can't wait now having seen your photos. Great shot of the PSB, worthy of a magazine! Just found you via the GSC, off to check out the rest of your blog now (especially Saffron crocus which I'm growing for first time this year and is just sprouting. Woohoo!).

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    1. Cheers.. I know what you mean: I constantly have autumn harvest envy (tomatoes, corn, melons, apples...) from seeing northern hemisphere blogs. I shall be sure to check your out!
      Goodluck with the saffron!

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  7. Ah artichokes and purple sprouting broccoli. Those are somethings that don't really grow well here. Well you can grow artichokes as annuals, but they don't over winter.

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    1. I'm glad we have a good climate for them, as I'm such a lazy gardener that artichokes would be a bit too much hard work for me to grow as an annual.

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  8. Healthy kale and your asparagus is looking very good. Is the purple sprouting broccoli as nice as the green variety? The artichoke is such a pretty flower and delightful to view. It sounds like you are gearing up for outside planting, kicking those seedlings out of the house :D

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    1. Cheers merryn! I would say the purple sprouting broccoli is just as good as regular, but nothing special. It's just I keep hearing it described as if it's was an extra special broccoli delicacy, but to me it's really not. Maybe it's just me.
      Yes, outdoor planting here I come. I may even start planting seeds direct outside (gasp!) :)

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  9. Yay, I'm growing the same type of Kale, love how easy it grows! I've tried growing broccoli in the past but always give up before the head grows as by that time, it's normally infested with really bad aphids - ick!. Yours is looking gorgeous though :)

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    1. Yes, red Russian kale is excellent.
      I've had plenty of aphid problems in the past, but this year has been fine. I have no idea why.

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  10. That tomato is hugging those bricks for warmth so I bet you will definitely get a tomato early this year. It's warming up here nicely and its full swing with planting too. Jealous of your purple sprouting broccoli he looks really good.

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    1. Bring on summer I say! Nice to hear things are warming up for you up north.
      I cannot wait for the first tomato. May it be soon!

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  11. A very satisfying feeling when you see your grafts take off. Looks like everything is starting to take off.

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  12. I love your purple sprouting broccoli. Don't know if I could get away with it here in Sydney but maybe I should try!

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