Surprise harvest...

26 September, 2014

Yesterday I went out to pick some broccoli for my dinner. This is the main broccoli patch I'm currently trying to keep up with.


This patch is in the orchard, where earlier in the year (in around February from memory) I chucked a whole heap of saved mixed brassica seeds from last year's harvest. What came up was a bit of a mixed bag, with most of them ending up as some oddly flowering but nevertheless tasty broccoli's.

Due to my admittedly poor thinning they were a massively crowded with not a bit of space between plants.


I picked a nice main head and a few side shoots.


And then I saw this:


OMG! Mushrooms!

This bed benefited from a heap of mushroom compost when I planted the previous crop, which was potatoes.

It seems the dark, moist space beneath the brassicas was enough for some mushrooms to come up. And there were quite a few.


I had to go inside and get another basket.


Now of course I double checked my five mushroom reference books to be sure these weren't going to kill me. But I couldn't possibly have mistaken these for anything poisonous. The only other thing they could possibly have been were Yellow Stainers, which I've had in my garden before, but these didn't have the yellow staining upon bruising. So I felt pretty safe.

These went into my dinner (a warm salad of freekeh, broccoli, preserved artichokes with leftover roast beef). 


The mushrooms were an excellent addition. Yay for surprise harvests.

12 comments:

  1. That dinner looks so divine. One day I plan to get some mushroom kits to innoculate some logs. One day.. in the meantime, perhaps I should just plant broccoli:)

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    1. It was rather nice if I say so myself. ;)
      I too would love to innoculate some mushroom logs. I even looked into and almost bought the plugs. What stopped me is I need some decent timber logs. I don't have anything that I think they'd like to grow in *sad face*

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    2. It's really time to start guerilla gardening for oaks.

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  2. I'm still hoping that I'll stumble across a species of delicious fungus with low humidity requirements, indifference to temperature fluctations, and that grows on a eucalyptus log substrate. There must be edible indigenous fungi, dagnabbit.

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    1. There are (to my admittedly ameteur knowledge) some edible indigenous fungi. There are even indigenous Aus truffles, but I don't know if they compare to the Italian and French truffles for flavour. Sadly a lot of the food knowledge of aboriginals has been lost. Interestingly in Aus we have an incredibly diverse range of fungi. Apparrently in Europe they have around 4-5000 species of fungi, whereas here in Aus we have >15000, and they still really don't know how many. So maybe there is a delicious, low humidity, temp flexible, eucalyptus loving 'shroom out there.

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    2. I didn't know about Australia's fungus diversity, or native truffles - wow! And yep, seems pretty likely that a culture that hung out with this land for 40,000 years or so would have gleaned some precious knowledge about edible indigenous fungi. Hoping that some good mycologist does the research and lets us all know :-)

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    3. Indeed. I'm not sure I'd be willing to be on the testing panel, given some of the stories of how poisonous mushrooms do their thing, though.

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  3. woo hoo, what a great find, and what a delicious looking dish. so healthy and yummy, and so much fun to make something straight from your garden. it's why we do it!.

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    1. It is indeed why we do it! So much more fun that getting food from the supermarket!

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