I just went out to pick something for a salad...

16 September, 2014


...and somehow I ended up with enough for a meal. Or three.

I just couldn't stop picking. There was always another pea pod to pick before it got too starchy, or another broccoli side shoot to chop before it goes to seed.

All of a sudden my basket was overflowing, and I hadn't even gotten to the lettuce yet.

(The asparagus was just a bonus, and what every salad needs a little finely sliced onion for flavour.)

Does anyone else suffer the pain of too much produce?

I try and preserve as much as I can. Broccoli and peas will be frozen over the coming weeks, to provide for future meals after the plants give up the ghost or succumb to aphids.

I try and give as much surplus away as I can. I'm taking two massive bags of lemons into work this week from when I pruned back the tree, as just one example. I try and foist my excess onto anyone who will take it, but as garden produce can be a little ad hoc, so sometimes I still just end up with too much to deal with.

I keep meaning to get to a garden swap near me, but the time it runs often clashes with other commitments of mine so I haven't yet gotten around to this strategy yet.

How do you deal with garden excess? Am I missing another option?

10 comments:

  1. This is a good problem to have! I'm a super keen preserver, so the recent lemon glut turned into frozen cubes of lemon juice and several jars of preserved lemons, which make good presents. Too many beans/peas/broccoli/caulis can be frozen. Too many leaves can be shared with chooks, who in my experience have a pretty limitless interest in salad. Cabbage = sauerkraut.

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    1. True. First world problems. Yes, preserved lemons as presents! I like that idea.
      Yes, I am learning that chooks will eat pretty much any leaves.
      While I am of German descent, I don't really like saurekraut. But I do love kim chi. Maybe I will have to try that instead!

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  2. Love it! I'm a little worried about my asparagus, no sign of it yet! Your harvesting knife looks beautiful too. How does frozen broccoli pull up? Would it be ok in stir fries or does it end up a bit mushy? Cheers.

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    1. I wouldn't worry just yet, only one of my plants is sending up spears while the others are still dormant.
      The harvesting knife was from my trip to Aperge (a restaurant that focusses on veg and has its own farm) in Paris last year - the knife you use for the meal they give you as a souvenir. I love how it is now my home veg harvest knife. Feels like a full circle.
      Frozen broccoli is ok - a little bendy but still acceptable. I find it better to cook pre freeze (slightly undercooking) and then make sure on the defrost/reheat you don't over-reheat and then overcook it.

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  3. That's such a beautiful essay in green and purple - looks like a magazine shot!

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    1. Cheers! I do love the purple sprouting broccoli and purple podded peas. They are so photogenic.

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  4. That is a beautiful harvest. I feel your over-abundance pain, although we are at the end of our season instead of the beginning. I have been finding it hard to keep up with preserving the tomatoes - life is getting in the way!

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    1. Cheers! I hope I have your problem of too much in a few months time.
      Ah, preserving. It is a wonderful thing, if only there were enough hours in the day.

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  5. what a gorgeous basket of goodies! i woudl be so happy with that right now.
    i cannot remember having a glut of anything, i guess because my garden space is smallish. however my parents often do! i must admit now, i know i said i'm enjoying their crazy-never-ending sprouting broccolli, but i'm fast approaching burnout on that one... one floret too many.
    i still wish i could help you with all those lemons. :-)

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    1. E, its only a matter of time before you have gluts, let me assure you! I remember the early days or gardening where every pea was cherished. Now I have so many they go past their best and are only good for compost. Too much is both a blessing and a curse.
      You are more than welcome to lemons anytime! :)

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