Very late apples...

25 July, 2014


Following up on my run down of my early apple harvest and mid-season apple harvest, here is the latest harvest of apples.

(For more info on the 50+ apple trees I currently grow in my suburban garden, see here.)

The majority of the late cropping apples have been the Sundowners. This apple killed it with produce this year, setting over 100 apples which I later thinned to about 50 in an effort to stop the tree from exhausing itself and becoming a bi-annual producer. Given this tree was one of the first apples planted in 2009, I would expect it to be hitting its stride about now.


These apples start as a muted green and red striped apple, and I picked a few of these early apples in around May when they were a bit under-ripe and tart. By mid-winter they really come into their own, turning a gorgeous dark red worthy of a witches spell.

The flavour of the Sundowner is nice, but unremarkable. It is a tart-ish, sweet-ish apple-y flavour, very enjoyable but nothing special excepting that it grew in my yard and I have the added fun of picking an apple for my work lunch on the way out to my car in the morning, which I'm sure adds to the eating pleasure.

The other late cropping apple which set fruit this year was the Lady Williams. This was a tree planted out in (I think) 2012 and this has been its first crop. It set two apples, which I have been fiercely guarding from marauding possums and birds and the like.


These are a beautiful red with green-y-yellow-y splotches. The flavour was a slightly honey-ed tart-ish flavour, and given it's parent apples are the Granny Smith and Rokewood (and itself being crossed with Golden Delicious to produce both the Cripp's Pink aka Pink Lady and the aforementioned Sundowner) I can see where those flavours came from. It really does taste a little of Granny Smith. I've also heard that they are even better tasting when they've been picked and stored for a bit, so I'm leaving the other one for a month or so and seeing if it is true.

Given the rest of the garden is truly in winter mode, I love having fresh fruit to pick in the middle of winter. Late apples really are worthwhile even for that joy alone. 

8 comments:

  1. Oooh, that sundowner is a pretty apple. I have only two trees, very boring, a gala and a fuji, and the apples that are left hanging on there are still yummy, even though the first ones ripened in March. Do any of your trees still have leaves, or is it just fruit now?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nothing wrong with those two apples. I also have a fugi, but no gala.
      A couple of trees have a few straggly leaves, the most being on the Sundowner and the Australian Beauty. But most of the apples are bare now.

      Delete
  2. Gosh aren't they both completely different in colour? How exciting to not only have such different colours but tastes in the garden that are grabbable on the way to work! Nice effort. I too just brought a couple of bare rooted dwarf apples, now to find somewhere that they are going to like in the garden...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are. It's amazing to see the nuances of colour across the varieties, and also how much they change as they ripen. The Lady Williams I'm leaving will get a much darker maroon red, given the pictures I've seen.
      Good luck with your dwarf apples. I hope to hear you blog about them sometime. :)

      Delete
  3. Can't wait for an order I placed with Woodbridge's in Tasmania to arrive. I currently have a 'snow white' because it takes me back to being a little kid, granny smith and a cider variety which I grafted 3 cider suitable varieties onto. Now trying to work out planting spots for the new babies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So exciting! Waiting for apple trees is like kids waiting for Christmas!
      Very excited to hear about your grafting. I'm planning to graft more varieties onto my trees - because obviously I don't have enough ;) - so watch this space.

      Delete
  4. what beautiful specimens. i've not seen the lady williams before but her speckles are very pretty!
    you could give the apple musuem in tassie's huon valley a run for its money, if you have over 50 apple trees, bek!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers.
      I've actually been to the Huon Apple Museum - I am somewhat embarrassed to admit it but I purposely drove to Huonville from Hobart just to go there. Yes I am that much of an apple nerd. It was excellent. I highly recommend it.

      Delete