Morning meander...

17 May, 2014

Having been unwell the last week, I haven't been up to much in the garden. But being on the mend I felt up to a little morning meander today to see what the garden is up to.

Perpetual spinach being perpetual.

A few more zucchini's are likely before the plant completely curls up its toes.

Brassica's abound - these are broccoli.

Savoy cabbages starting to form.

Red Russian kale - grown from saved seed and randomly chucked into the espalier apple bed.

Autumn colours are showing - this is the smoke bush.

Asparagus bed going golden.

However the fig tree is pretty much done. (Don't you just love grey Melbourne skies.)

But it's not all bad news. The capsicums are happy in their greenhouse.

Alliums (potato onions, garlic and shallots) are coming along well.

There are still some cucumbers hiding amongst the apples.

And a solo tomato has braved the cold. I expect nothing will come of it, but feel I should support such a brave plant.

On the fruit front there are still lots of step-over Pink Lady apples...

... and Sundowners (which I've chosen to finally net just in case)

... and the two first Lady Williams, which I'm also protecting from potential fruit thieves.

No need to protect the lemons though. There are enough for everyone.
 
Also fruiting are the strawberries, but oddly as I'm sure you will agree. Anyone know what is going on here?

And though not strictly fruit, the violets are out. I may be making more sugared violets.

And lastly, the lilacs don't seem to know what season it is. I'm not complaining though. The scent is lovely.

12 comments:

  1. I love the way you've protected those apples—a plastic container inside the net bag. Am I right? Mental note made. ;-)

    It looks like some form of virus on the strawberries...I believe they're pretty susceptible to viruses. Touch wood, mine haven't shown any problems, yet.

    Glad you're feeling better. There's nothing like a productive garden for good medicine! Thanks for the inspiring photos.

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    1. Yes, I love this system for two reasons - 1: its easy to do, and 2: if the fruit falls the bag catches it, so less waste.
      Thanks for the well wishes.

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  2. Glad you're on the mend, and there is so much loveliness in this post. I'm always looking longingly at other people's edible gardens when I walk past.

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    1. Cheers, I too love sneak peeking into others' gardens to see what is going on. So many good ideas...

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  3. Sorry you've been poorly. That russian Kale is a good one isn't it? Very tender. And I know we always want what we can't have, but I am totally on love with your lemon tree..... *sighs theatrically* x

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    1. Thanks, though it is almost worth it to hear the word 'poorly' - so underused.
      I'll swap the lemon tree for the cooking pears gladly ;)

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  4. That should read 'in love' obvs x

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    1. Of course. ;) I didn't even notice it until you mentioned it.

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  5. i hoep you are on the mend, bek. that lilac would cheer any soul - at this time of the year?! mine are losing their leaves and fast looking like sticks! you have so much going on in your garden still.

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    1. Yes, much better thanks!
      I know, its strange. And its not just one, it's all four of them. I can't explain it.

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  6. Gosh your brassicas are looking fabulous (of course you were no doubt cleverer and earlier than I was at getting mine in). That fig and lemon look positively divine. I can only hope mine will grow as big.

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    1. Yes, I have learnt that I need to get my brassicas growing in Jan/Feb if I'm to have anything worth harvesting!
      The fig was here before I was, so I can't take any credit for that one, but the lemon I planted 4 years ago and it's amazingly productive now.

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