Garden - post-holiday...

06 October, 2013

Hiya y'all. I'm back! After having braved the horrors of the 24 hour flight home I arrived back in Melbourne, Australia at the god forsaken hour of 5:15am. But I was awake and excited to see how the garden had been holding up while I was away. So pretty much first thing I did on arriving home was head out into the garden.

If you will recall I did a post on my pre-holiday garden. Here is the comparison of mid-August (i.e. end winter) with October (i.e. mid-spring):

Back yard:

Pre-holiday

Post-holiday


The peach (variety 'Anzac') has blossomed and set fruit! I reckon there would be easily 30 peaches on the tree, which is a massive gain from last years' 11 fruits. Given the tree is only two years old I'm very pleased.


Also on the fruiting front, the step-over apples are flowering like mad. I really hope these set fruit!

Interestingly though, these are variety 'Pink Lady', and I have another 'Pink Lady' in the orchard (see later in post) in a standard cordon espalier, which hasn't come close to flowering yet. I'm guessing its micro-climate, but I'm intrigued.


The other side of the backyard looks much the same.

Pre-holiday

Post-holiday

The bearded irises are looking pretty, but otherwise it is much the same. The standard apples are just about to burst into flower and the passionfruit is putting out new growth, but obviously its early days for this bit.

Onto the front yard:

Pre-holiday

Post-holiday

Again, not much different here. The only thing is on the left the pear tree has gone into leaf. I can't see any baby pears on it, sadly. The lemon tree though is making up for its lack of production, going into flower and I can already see many, many baby lemons forming. I think a lemon give-away to friends and family is in order.

Moving further into the front yard, changes appear.

Pre-holiday

Post-holiday

The gorgeously foliaged smoke bush (front and centre in magenta-y leaves) has come into its own, which unfortunately mostly hides the plum tree in the bed behind. It has precisely three flowers on it. Fingers crossed I will get the first fruit from this tree.



On the right though, is the white mulberry. It has lots of little mulberries on it. I'm very excited about this, as this is the second white mulberry tree I've had. The first one took a couple of years to fruit, then as it turned out, they were not white mulberries.

I was not pleased.


In the end I ripped out the tree and replaced it with this one from Daley's Fruit Trees (no kickback for me, I just have always found their plants to be excellent). This one is the variety 'White Shahtoot'. I hope not to be disappointed this time.

The celeriac has gone to seed. I'm letting it, and hoping that the saved seed will work well in my garden. I've always found celeriac doesn't germinate well for me. That said, I can't remember if the celeriac are heirloom or hybrid type. If hybrid I may be wasting my time. Ah well.  

Also going to seed are the lettuces. The ducks will be happy, as they will get those.

The brassicas have gone mad! Pretty much everything in the brassica bed has gone to seed, including tuscan kale, green curly kale and red russian kale, unformed red cabbages, purple sprouting broccoli (I'm really sad I missed those), a couple of cabbages I can't remember the variety of, and the red brussels sprouts of which I precisely nil brussels sprouts from.

They are also completely covered in aphids. They will get pulled out and go into the compost this weekend.

Only one savoy cabbage has not gone to seed, and the mini white cauliflowers. I have no idea if I'll get cauliflowers from these, but am hoping so.


However there are some plants I'm happy to see go to seed, or at least attempt to. The artichokes are going completely nuts. I think I counted eight artichokes on one plant!

It may be time for Artichoke Risotto.





The main raised veg patch has some small changes.

Pre-holiday

Post-holiday

The peas are still going mad. Of the early sown tomatoes only four varieties survived, so emergency re-sowing of tomatoes will be a top priority.



The only new plants in the veg patch are some bean seedlings that have come up. I know I planted many more seeds than this, so I hope the others are not too far behind. That said, I usually have lots of problems with bean seedlings being eaten, so I'm very happy these have escaped the notice of the bugs. 




And lastly, onto the orchard.

Pre-holiday

Post-holiday

(Again, please ignore the house tiles from previous garden bed edging. I will put them away this weekend. I promise.)Unfortunately this photo doesn't show the spring time changes well.


Its hard to see, but quite a few apple trees are blooming. This gives you a bit of an idea what they look like on the supports.

The trees in this area range from 1-3 years old, some of them being transplanted and/or re-trained in that time, so they are all quite young, but I have hopes of some apples from the orchard this year. 



This is one of the oldest apple espaliers, being 4 years old. It is being trained in a totally different espalier style, being a variation on the traditional T shape, which is called the KNNN form.

There are many flowers, and I'm hopeful there will be lots of fruit on this one.





Also in the orchard area is that stalwart of the early spring harvests: Asparagus. They are growing madly.

I've been neglecting the asparagus of late. All year I kept meaning to give them a good feed with manure and compost, and mulch them well to stop weeds. Obviously I have done none of that, but they have thrived anyway. Another thing for the list for next year.


Another pre-holiday plant-and-hope-for-the-best has come good, with the potato plants looking lush.

They do need a good topping up of the planter barrels to hopefully increase the yield, but they are growing very well and I feel this may be a good year for potatoes.




So that's it for the garden comparison. I can't wait to get back into the garden and get my hands dirty!

6 comments:

  1. Coming home from a holiday, and rushing out into the garden to see what is happening. Is there a greater pleasure? Welcome home!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, I don't think there is a greater pleasure. Thanks!

      Delete
  2. Welcome home! You are not alone - just about the first thing I ever did on returning home from holidays or work trips was to visit the garden - thank you for the tour.

    Pre and Post holiday, your garden looks beautiful. Love your smoke bush!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers! The smoke bush is gorgeous! I am so happy I put it in a place where I can see it from my lounge room window, as the colours are magnificent.

      Delete
  3. It's all looking so lush and pretty. And thanks for all those holiday posts from France. So interesting to see those potager gardens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My pleasure. I'm glad I could share them.

      Delete