Saving seeds...

28 April, 2013

Sometimes I save seeds intentionally, and sometimes I end up saving seeds because I am lazy and don't pick things then they get past their eating prime and I end up telling myself it was good that I didn't harvest them so that I can use them for seed.

This is one of those times of the latter.

When I grew my three sisters arrangement this season the climbing beans were definitely the best growers. These were a bean called 'Climbing Princess' which was given to me by Tracey. The grew really well. A little too well in fact, in that they grew over and around the corn plants and then grew into each other and it was a little difficult to find the beans at times. So when I was pulling them out I found lots of dried bean pods.

This is only a small sample. 


Inside the pods were lots of very nicely formed beans.


So I collected all the pods and pulled out the seeds. I now have a mountain (ok, maybe a molehill) of bean seeds.


Does anyone know if you can eat bean seeds like regular dried beans. I would guess so, but have never tried it. Maybe they don't taste as good as the regular 'storing' beans like borlotti, black eyed etc. Maybe they do. Either way, I'd appreciate hearing from anyone's who has tried them.

But regardless of whether they're eat worthy, I have lots of bean seeds for next year. If they aren't edible I'll be trying to palm them off to anyone who would like some for growing. Any takers?

8 comments:

  1. Eat them, eat them, eat them! All the usual rules for cooking dried beans apply so you don't give yourself a bad stomach. Once I discovered this trick I felt like the pressure was off to eat all the bean pods green. I particularly like them when the beans are fully formed but still a bit wet - at that stage they don't need soaking, just 10 mins hard boil, followed by half hour simmer. I bet next year you'll be looking forward to your beany beans at the end of the season!

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    1. Ah, I shall take your advice! I have a feeling you're right, I'll be quite happy for my beans to go beyond fresh eating into storing bean stage.

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  2. I'm with asparagus pea. I try all my green bean seeds dried as well, some taste better than others but all taste pretty good. You just need to ensure you boil them for sufficient time to ensure you get rid of the toxins (which are in most bean seeds including kidney beans etc). As you only need to boil them for about 10 minutes to get rid of the toxins, and to get them soft you'll have to boil them for longer than that you should be fine.

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    1. Cheers, I shall give it a go!

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  3. Same as above Bek. I always save the bean seeds I don't get to eat green and eat them whether noted for their dried beany-ness or not. I enjoy them and, sitting in their kitchen glass jars, they are still available for planting. Winter is great for beany things - I cant wait to be inspired by the cold to get into my stash.

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    1. I've never done it, but feel like a bit of a fool now. Ah well, you learn something every day. I do like having lots of glass jars with beans in my kitchen also, and now to think some of these may be homegrown - even better!

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  4. I suggest doing a taste test, before boiling up a large quantity,as one of the varieties of beans I grew once specifically for dried beans ended up tasting very odd. I'd put my hand up for bean seeds but they wouldn't get past quarantine in Tas.

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    1. Thanks for the tip, I'll do that first. Yes, quarantine must be frustrating at times, but all for good reason. Pity though.

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