Harvest for keeping...

05 January, 2013

So much of what I grow is designed for immediate consumption, or at least within 24hrs. With gluts it's a matter of using up what can't be used then and there, in which the Fowlers Vacola unit or dehydrator usually plays a part.

But today's harvest needs no such work. Today I harvested the onion crop.

They were thankfully much more successful than my garlic crop this year, but they were in an area which gets sun pretty much all day, with the exception of the early morning when I took this photo. These days I do most of my gardening first thing in the morning and after 5pm, otherwise its just too damn hot.


In the middle of this bed is the young plum tree, and last year it was the watermelon bed - which is why there are self seeded watermelons beginning to sprawl.

As you can see, the onions had started to bend over at the neck, which is a sign they are ready for harvest.


I grew 3 varieties of onions; Early Cream Gold, Barletta and Sweet Domenica.

The biggest by far were the Sweet Domenica (I'm definitely growing these again next year), followed by Early Cream Gold, then Barletta. Though each variety had some big 'uns and small 'uns.

The biggest of the Sweet Domenica's

The tiddliest of the Barletta's

But all up it was a decent harvest.



Now I have laid them out on a very old and decrepit table that gets a little morning sun but mostly is in shade to dry out before plaiting for storage. The hot weather will do all the work in drying them, thank goodness.


Hopefully this will keep me in onions for a while.

10 comments:

  1. Yum yum yum yum YUM! Those are some lovely looking onions. I pulled mine up a while back and turned them into pickled onions :-)

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    1. Cheers! Hmmm, pickling onions, I may need to give that a try...

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  2. Oh, and to answer your question about ducks... My ducks are Indian Runner ducks. There is a lot of positive things to be said for this bread. From my experience they are an exceptional pet. Gentle in nature and easy to care for. All they need is somewhere to paddle (a plastic shell pool from Bunnings for $15 does the trick!). I use their dirty pond water on my vegetable garden and it is the best fertiliser I have ever used. Indian Runner ducks are also great because they naturally don't fly, so no need to clip their wings. And if you keep females you will be able to collect lots of yummy eggs (usually 5 per week).

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    1. Thanks for the info!! I have been investigating ducks all week and am following up on a breeder at the moment - I'm thinking Welsh Harlequins, which apparently also don't fly (they get off the ground, but won't escape backyards), but I like the plastic shell pool tip! And I definitely can't wait for eggs - we used to occasionally get some from a person who sold them from their backyard ducks, but they got rid of the ducks sadly and I've not had them since. Maybe now I'll be the duck egg lady...

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  3. I was wondering when to pull my onions - tomorrow I think as the necks have definitely fallen over, nice tip. I just grew red onions this year - a salad variety which seem to have done really well.

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    1. No problem, I can't remember where I got it from but it has worked for me in the past! I wish I had planted some red onions, but I neglected to buy seed for them this year. Next year perhaps...

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  4. Fantastic! They look lovely. I have yet to 'master' onions. In fact I have never taken them on. I did have real success with French shallots when I lived in England and where you could easily buy sets - they were great. I must try onions out.

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    1. Cheers! These are the best onions I've ever grown. My tips would be they love full sun, and they are a suprisingly hungry crop so lots of feeding (though I've heard if the manure is too fresh they don't store well). They grow during winter which is great as they aren't taking up room in the prime garden real estate of the rest of the year.

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  5. Nice crop Bek! If you dry them out until the stalks go brown, they keep even longer. I have my harvest stored in the dark, cool pantry in a wicker basket. They last until the end of the crop without going rotten.

    Gav x

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    1. That is the plan, and they're looking pretty dry already. I'm glad to hear they last that long, as I've had shop bought ones go mouldy in storage and was worried they might too.

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